Fludde, Peter Mishler

Fludde Cover.jpg
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Fludde Cover.jpg
Mishler photo.png

Fludde, Peter Mishler

14.95

Selected by Dean Young as winner of the Kathryn A. Morton Prize in Poetry, Fludde draws on Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience to critique and dismantle contemporary American values and conditioning. Mishler’s poems are a series of strange, atmospheric surrealist dioramas; the language is both beautiful and skillful, a conflation of fever dream and real live earth.

Pre-order only. Available May 2018.

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Peter Mishler was born in New Jersey, and lives in Kansas City where he teaches and serves as an editor for Drunken Boat. His work has been featured at Conjunctions, The Literary Review, Public Pool and Poetry Daily, and was selected for the Best New Poets series. This is his first book. 
 

PRAISE FOR FLUDDE:

“In this uncompromising collection, it is understood that shades of the prison house begin to close upon the growing self, and that the sound of the chimneysweeper’s broom is “-weep -weep.” There’s a powerful moral imagination at work in Fludde, and its poems are darkly and passionately self-knowing about the consequences of how the childhood self is, as it grows, incorporated into the world around it. Read ‘Little Lord Fauntleroy,’ ‘Workhorse,’ and ‘Blind Minotaur Being Led By a Girl.’ Read all of the poems in this wonderful book. It’s a joy to experience Mishler’s individual skill, his inventiveness, his beautiful knowing versification.”

—David Ferry, author of Bewilderment, winner of the National Book Award for poetry

 

“Full of the feral joy of invention and profoundly animated, Fludde makes us feel, as only poetry can, that we’ve found a companion for our dream life.  I’d say this is good news.” 

—Dean Young

 

“The poems in Fludde make the uncanny uncanny again, no small feat in an era in which reality surpasses the imagination at every turn. It’s when we’re closer to being persuaded into thinking that the role of invention is to come up with tools to best convey real life’s inconceivable scenarios that we most need our imaginings. Mishler’s roam defiantly free, as in the realm of the oneiric and children’s fabulations. This book is incredible.”

—Mónica de la Torre