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Rachel Z Arndt to Read at Why There Are Words reading series

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Sunday, November 4th, 2018

Bowery Club, 308 Bowery

New York, NY 10012

Time TBD

Rachel Z. Arndt, author of Beyond Measure, will be reading at the Why There Are Words reading series on November 4th.

Rachel Z. Arndt is a writer and editor whose debut essay collection, Beyond Measure, came out from Sarabande books in 2018. She received MFAs from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the University of Iowa’s Nonfiction Writing Program and a BA in creative writing and Spanish from Brown University. She now lives in Chicago.

Praise for Beyond Measure

[T]he essays in Beyond Measure are beautiful in an intricate, knotty way, as in how math is beautiful, or the interior of a mechanical watch. . . . Once, when reading Beyond Measure on the train, I missed my stop, so engrossed was I in the book." —The Collapsar

"Rachel Z. Arndt’s collection demonstrates beautifully the marvelous ability of the personal essay to carve out of the ordinary events of everyday life a piece of shaped experience.” —Vivian Gornick

“In the grip of Rachel Z. Arndt’s spellbindingly obsessive mind, nearly everything shines with measurability and poetry and disturbing familiarity. She studies bird dissections, sails through a lightning storm, explains the etiquette of scamming Bed Bath & Beyond, kicks ass at a judo tournament, ponders the cultural history of the heights of kitchen counters, and formulates a phenomenology of creeping on people at the gym. Riding the folds of Arndt’s remarkable imagination, we come to realize that her obsession is in fact a cultural obsession, an American predicament, our most curious collective pastime.”—John D'Agata, author of About a Mountain and A New History of the Essay

 

“[Beyond Measure] is a delight to read. Arndt prompts readers to examine the 'measurements' imposed on their lives. . . . Her experiences will particularly resonate with female readers, who will identify with her coping mechanisms for dealing with sexist measurements imposed by society, from stereotypes of narcoleptic women as hysterical and attention seeking to false constraints placed on female intelligence and physical strength. Her tone is poignant and undogmatic. . . . Arndt's debut provides close insight into one woman's personal struggles while never becoming overbearing or overly solemn."—Publishers Weekly